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Yeef, 10K and down to wear bars already.
#11

(10-17-2020, 01:15 AM)Vector-BFC Wrote:  How much is a set of Toyo's, The P's are way pricey.
About a buck thirty-five ea, IIRC. Fronts only. They bill it as a 45K tire. They had a 70K one for more (160ish?) but I figured it might be too hard a compound. Baby bear soup - just right. They don’t make a rear that size apparently. They offered up a different brand, I don’t recall which, for about $300 when I was ready. If the Fed dances too badly in the rain, it’ll be sooner rather than later. I suspect that will always be a concern with the contact patch v weight issue. No matter what. If I can safely do 70ish whatever the tire, that’ll get me there. Doing less than 55 to keep the hydroplaning down with the other idiots doing 70 plus in a rainstorm is not my dream situation.
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#12

What tire pressure were you guys running with the results given in prev reads.

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#13

(04-02-2022, 10:59 PM)RustyTeeth Wrote:  What tire pressure were you guys running with the results given in prev reads.
25 psi in the OEMs and 25 in the new ones.
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#14

4k to 8k miles on a sport bike is normal close to 200$ per tire not unreasonable. Sure they have longer wearing tires.
This is a bike! A high performance bike.

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#15

(04-17-2022, 09:33 PM)RustyTeeth Wrote:  4k to 8k miles on a sport bike is normal close to 200$ per tire not unreasonable.  Sure they have longer wearing tires.
This is a bike!  A high performance bike.
Not exactly. The front tires on this species of trike are stressed like no motorcycle tire can be in that they are called on to manage both the application of the rotational forces from the motor on the one hand and the steering forces on the other. That’s why the rear will easily outlast three or four tire changes to the front in this vehicle. The contact patches on a m/c are positively microscopic in comparison as well and the wt/sq unit of measure is far lower in the VDHs. I submit that 10k on the OEM tires is indeed unreasonable, despite their dual calling, in view of the fact that the newer dual-compound tires on m/c are getting 25-30k. But, again, apples to oranges. I think the soft OEMs are there to keep the idiots among us (not excluding self, btw) between the curbs while feeling out the car. Ride behind a VDH for a bit on a bike and enjoy the delightful shower of debris that embeds in the soft tires long enough to get thrown in the air. That sort of squishy softness just can’t last long. The rain performance of the OEMs is absolutely atrocious as well and the tires start to hover above the road with the least amount of ponding and it can be quite disconcerting if not downright fatal. I suspect the assumption is that the avg driver will be out on a sunny Sunday safely killing bugs with the front grille rather than skiing between semis on the freeway in the rain. I myself prefer the bug cleanup. With better water-managing tires one can live to “enjoy” it. With a harder compound in a water-shucking tread pattern they can last long enough and safely enough to rid the world of a lot of bugs.
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#16

(04-18-2022, 12:47 PM)Fiddyfoe Wrote:  
(04-17-2022, 09:33 PM)RustyTeeth Wrote:  4k to 8k miles on a sport bike is normal close to 200$ per tire not unreasonable.  Sure they have longer wearing tires.
This is a bike!  A high performance bike.
Not exactly. The front tires on this species of trike are stressed like no motorcycle tire can be in that they are called on to manage both the application of the rotational forces from the motor on the one hand and the steering forces on the other. That’s why the rear will easily outlast three or four tire changes to the front in this vehicle. The contact patches on a m/c are positively microscopic in comparison as well and the wt/sq unit of measure is far lower in the VDHs. I submit that 10k on the OEM tires is indeed unreasonable, despite their dual calling, in view of the fact that the newer dual-compound tires on m/c are getting 25-30k. But, again, apples to oranges. I think the soft OEMs are there to keep the idiots among us (not excluding self, btw) between the curbs while feeling out the car. Ride behind a VDH for a bit on a bike and enjoy the delightful shower of debris that embeds in the soft tires long enough to get thrown in the air. That sort of squishy softness just can’t last long. The rain performance of the OEMs is absolutely atrocious as well and the tires start to hover above the road with the least amount of ponding and it can be quite disconcerting if not downright fatal. I suspect the assumption is that the avg driver will be out on a sunny Sunday safely killing bugs with the front grille rather than skiing between semis on the freeway in the rain. I myself prefer the bug cleanup. With better water-managing tires one can live to “enjoy” it. With a harder compound in a water-shucking tread pattern they can last long enough and safely enough to rid the world of a lot of bugs.
Yes, I agree. Consider me corrected. I'm still running the 30 psi recommended on the sticker between the seats. These things are FAST and the torque steer/ along with the decel steer if that's a real thing.  Still evaluating the traction switch that changes several things.  Book says 25 psi. Any results for either pressures yet?

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